Malaria

Communication plays a powerful role in addressing behavioral barriers and shaping demand for health products and services. Uptake of short-acting methods of contraception and combined use of ORS and zinc to manage child diarrhea remains low in India.

Social marketing as a public health intervention has existed for several decades and is familiar to donors and governments in many countries. In some cases, it may be necessary to advocate for the intervention when its benefits and potential health impact are not well understood by local stakeholders.

As part of the GoodLife campaign, in June 2011 BCS and ProMPT, in partnership with the National Malaria Control Programme and the Ghana Health Service, launched the new “Aha ye de” malaria campaign. “Aha ye de” means “It’s Good Here” in Twi, one of Ghana’s national languages.

BRIDGE I

Running from 2003-2009, BRIDGE I was designed to energize change in the way Malawians think and speak about HIV/AIDS and more importantly, in how they act.

Funded by USAID, and running from 2004-2012, HCP was a global project managed by JHU CCP, to develop and implement communication strategies and strengthen capacity in social and behavior change communication (SBCC) for improved health in Uganda. Working in partnership with the Ugandan government and its partners, including USAID Implementing Partners, the project focused primarily on HIV prevention, care, treatment, and support; sexual and reproductive health of young people; family planning; malaria control; and TB control; while strengthening national SBCC capacity.

While taking measures to halt the spread of COVID-19 worldwide, it is essential that other killer diseases, such as malaria, are not ignored. It is known, from the recent Ebola outbreak in west Africa, that a sudden increased demand on fragile health services can lead to substantial increases in morbidity and mortality from other diseases, including malaria.

To complement the recent guidance from WHO GMP, the RBM Partnership to End Malaria (RBM) Social Behaviour Change (SBC) Working Group has developed interim guidance for malaria SBC in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is recognized that during this unprecedented time, malaria remains an issue in malaria affected countries and in the current context, community members and health workers may face additional challenges that significantly impact the health system. To this end, approaches and systems should be supported to deliver malaria services among communities, households, and individuals.

The PAHO Regional Malaria Program is aware of the imminent negative impact that the present COVID-19 pandemic is causing in the countries and their health systems, and consequently, in the fight against malaria in the countries of the Americas; considers that it is essential to guide national authorities; and draws attention to the main measures to be taken to maintain the continuity of actions against malaria, while protecting the health of healthcare workers and in line with national provisions for response to COVID-19. Malaria-specific guidance on the response to COVID-19 has been developed by WHO1 and is the main reference for this document.

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