-Human Rights

The COVID-19 pandemic is largely concentrated in cities and urban areas, with around 2,600 cities globally reporting at least one case of the disease. While the epicentre of the global health crisis is still Europe and North America, its impact on developing countries may be more devastating, especially for the poorest. The 1 billion+ people living in slums and slum-like settings in developing countries, where population density is high, are those most at-risk and least prepared. 

Ongoing marginalization or discrimination in societies around the world, caused and perpetuated in large part by unfair public policies, leads to certain people and groups having more or less access to resources and services based on their social class, race/ethnicity, gender, religion, migrant or citizenship status, ability, or other aspects of their identities.

UNAIDS is calling on countries to adopt a human rights-based approach in responding to the global outbreak of COVID-19 that puts communities at the centre and respects the rights and dignity of all. To help guide governments, communities and other stakeholders in planning and implementing measures to contain the pandemic,

This report focuses on the need to address patriarchal control of adolescent girls’ sexuality in the fight against child, early and forced marriage and unions, and highlights the vital role played by gender-transformative programs. The report presents findings from a review of 23 organizations that work at the intersection of child marriage and sexuality, and includes three case studies that feature the work of grassroots organizations working in politically and culturally conservative contexts.

 

The Saleema initiative, launched in 2008 by the National Council of Child Welfare (NCCW) and UNICEF Sudan,  supports the protection of girls from genital cutting, particularly in the context of efforts to promote collective abandonment of the practice at community level.

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