COVID-19 Rumors and Misinformation

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic UNICEF, with the help of funding from Johnson & Johnson, US Centers of Disease Control and the Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA), has sourced and digitzed a health worker training content library that can be deployed on a variety of digital channels, including SMS, Social Media Messaging Apps (i.e., WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Viber, Telegram), and other app-based learning management systems.

This is a collection of materials produced by, among other organizations. the Nepali and Indian Ministries of Health and Nepal’s National Health Education, Information and Communication Centre to share messages about COVID-19 prevention and care.

"Building on previous work on Ebola and Zika viruses using Global Health Security Agenda systems strengthening support, Breakthrough ACTION developed a process and technology for systematically collecting, analyzing, and addressing COVID-19 rumors in real-time in Côte d’Ivoire. Rumors were submitted through community-based contributors and collected from callers to the national hotlines and then processed on a cloud-hosted database.

This website is a collaborative initiative that houses content and creative materials, related to COVID-19, curated by an editorial team. This content is in English, Hindi and other regional languages, and formats include images, GIFs, Videos etc.  

"This paper describes the characteristics of an infodemic, which combines an inordinately high volume of information (leading to problems relating to locating the information, storage capacity, ensuring quality, visibility and validity) and rapid output (making it hard to assess its value, manage the gatekeeping process, apply results, track its history, and leading to a waste of effort).

This brief focuses on Covid-19 rumours circulating in the Rohingya camps of Cox’s Bazar. It explores some of the more common rumours, discusses sources and formats of information, presents community perspectives about rumours and communication, and suggests approaches to communicating with the Rohingya community about COVID-19.

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