COVID-19 Rumors and Misinformation

The overall goal of this strategy is to effectively coordinate Kenyan national and county communications and community engagement activities to prevent the spread of the disease, build trust in the leaders and health workers to provide accurate information and essential services, and encourage communities’ active participation in supporting the risk reduction and response measures.

In Burkina Faso, the COVID-19 pandemic has triggered a variety of reactions among some Ouagadougou residents that have complicated efforts for a timely response. Hesitancy to get tested, avoiding contact tracers, or wariness of what the neighbors will say are some of these reactions.

Sharing unverified information during the COVID-19 pandemic can be dangerous, unhealthy, and make our life more confusing. UNESCO and the World Health Organization are calling out this Infodemic and calling on you to be on the frontline for truth. It’s easy. Watch the video for the simple actions we can all take on how to identify false information, verify trusted sources, and help ourselves and loved ones to stay safe.

This article states that a key part of the problem of misinformation is that the public is effectively presented with various sources of information, through different digital media platforms, sometimes from anonymous sources and other times from figures claiming to have some degree of authority or credibility. It can be difficult to discern fact from fiction. And most worryingly this happens with alarming regularity, and spurious claims can gain incredible traction with huge swathes of the public in matter of days, even hours.

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