COVID-19 Rumors and Misinformation

These insights are based on a combination of automated media monitoring and manual review by public health data analysts. Media data are publicly available data from many sources, such as social media, broadcast television, newspapers and magazines, news websites, online video, blogs, and more.

The WHO Digital Health Flagship initiative has stated that digital technology could play a critical role during the COVID-19 pandemic by improving communications between people and health services, empowering individuals and patients, and strengthening critical public health functions including disease surveillance. The authors of this article ask whether technology also help build trust and promote vaccination within communities that are most at risk.

Health misinformation on social media threatens public health. One question that could lend insight into how and through whom misinformation spreads is whether certain people are susceptible to many types of health misinformation, regardless of the health topic at hand.

The Royal College of Physicians is urging people not to share "copycat" and "dangerous" videos claiming steam inhalation can prevent Covid-19. The BBC has found that alternative coronavirus treatments are being sent on chat apps like WhatsApp, as well as being widely available on social media.

'COVID-19 Mythbusters' are messages developed to counter popular rumous about COVID-19. These rumors were entered into a rumor tracking system.

This resource was created by the UNICEF Programme Division, Health Section, Immunization Unit C4D team, in collaboration with The Public Good Projects, First Draft and Yale Institute of Global Health.

Pages