Researchers

n many countries, efforts to contain COVID-19 have resulted in an economic recession, pushing millions out of their jobs, and creating previously unprecedented unemployment in many countries worldwide. In addition to the millions of people infected by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), hundreds of thousands have died—and will die—from COVID-19.

This paper focuses on adherence to behaviors required to reduce COVID-19 virus transmission. The authors argue that there is an urgent need to develop and evaluate interventions to promote effective enactment of these behaviors and provide a preliminary analysis to help guide this. This is relevant for the current phase of the pandemic and to reduce the risk of resurgence in months to come and of future pandemics.

The Gender and COVID-19 Research Project aims to conduct real time gender analysis to identify and document the gendered dynamics of the outbreak and gender gaps in preparedness and response measures, providing immediate guidance and recommendations to those crafting policies and delivering public health interventions.

In this report, the Partnership for EvidenceBased Response to COVID-19 (PERC), a consortium of global public health organizations and private sector firms, brings together findings from a survey conducted March 29-April 17, 2020 in 28 cities across 20 AU Member States, along with epidemiological measures of disease transmission and indicators of population movements and unrest, among others. Synthesized, these data provide a first-of-its-kind snapshot of baseline conditions in Africa during this rapidly evolving pandemic.

There is now emerging a wealth of commentary on the gendered implications of the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. We know that crises can spur new ways of behaving, sometimes leading to shifts in gender norms and underpinning sustained change towards gender equality. But with the fast spreading coronavirus pandemic many gender inequalities have already been intensified as existing discriminatory and harmful norms continue or worsen in the face of change such as violence against women, which has intensified globally under lockdowns and in the face of economic stress. 

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