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Unlike historical pandemics, such as the 1918 H1N1 pandemic, COVID-19 is spreading across a highly connected world, in which virtually all individuals are linked to each other through the mobile phone in their pockets. Because of strict physical distancing measures, people are heavily reliant on maintaining connectivity using global digital social networks, such as Facebook or Twitter, to facilitate human interaction and information sharing about the virus.

Ce guide concis comprend des réflexions, des ressources et des messages importants pour aider les programmes nationaux à adapter leurs programmes de CSC axés sur la PF/SR face aux défis posés par le COVID-19. Les adaptations apportées aux programmes et aux messages doivent refléter le contexte national, les services disponibles et la réponse du gouvernement local, notamment celle des instances de coordination en charge de la communication sur les risques liés au COVID-19 et des efforts d'engagement communautaire.

This short guide includes important considerations, messages, and resources to support country programs in adapting their FP/RH-focused SBC programming in response to the challenges presented by COVID-19. Program adaptations and messaging should be adapted in line with country context, available services, and local government response, including that of coordinating bodies responsible for COVID-19 risk communication and community engagement efforts. 

In previous epidemics, rapidly expanding healthcare teams through community health workers (CHWs) has proven to be fundamental to an effective response. During recent Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemics in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and west Africa, nations like Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea, Nigeria, and the DRC rapidly hired, trained, and equipped thousands of CHWs from communities affected by or at risk of Ebola.

For the large number of low-income country residents who live in informal settlements, or slums, will be ill-served by well-publicized measures that rely on the stockpiling of food, the availability of savings, the ability to work from home, and the need to keep your distance even from close relatives.

This short guide is designed to assist development and humanitarian agencies to think through how risk communication and community engagement activity related to COVID-19 can be carried out without face-to-face interaction with communities.

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